Sanna Kramsi - I would if I could a guide to web accessibility

Deaf-blindness

Deaf-blindness is a condition that affects both hearing and vision, to varying degrees. People with deaf-blindness may have difficulty perceiving information through both sight and sound.

What barriers might people with deaf-blindness encounter on the web?

There are several potential barriers, but here are a couple of examples:

  • Inaccessible visual content: Websites that rely heavily on visual content, such as images, videos, or graphs, may be inaccessible for people with deaf-blindness who cannot see the content.
  • Inaccessible audio content: Websites that rely heavily on audio content, such as podcasts or audio-only instructions, may be inaccessible for people with deaf-blindness who cannot hear the content.
  • Lack of alternative formats: Websites that do not provide alternative formats, such as braille, tactile graphics, or audio descriptions, may be inaccessible for people with deaf-blindness.
  • Inaccessible navigation: Websites that are difficult to navigate, such as those with complex menus or unclear links, may be difficult for people with deaf-blindness to use.
  • Inaccessible forms and input fields: Websites that rely on visual input, such as CAPTCHAs or image-based verification, may be inaccessible for people with deaf-blindness.

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